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19-Oct-2017 22:49

Burritos, as we Americans know them today, pair ancient culinary traditions with contemporary expectations. Our survey of historic newspapers suggest food trucks played a roll. The "ito" suffix denotes a smaller version of the original item.

What makes burritos different from most other Mexican-American foods is the metamorhpasis of this dish. Burritos are efficient, economical, easy & delicious. A tortilla rolled and cooked on a griddle, then filled with a variety of condiments. The word, from Spanish for "little donkey," first saw print in America in 1934. A Mexican dish consisting of a maize-flour tortilla rolled round a savoury filling (of beef, chicken, refried beans, etc.) 1934: E. "..the Sonora and southeastern Arizona, some people make tortillas out of wheat, as well as, corn.

329-330) About churros "At every Spanish festival or carnival, one is sure to find a huge cauldron of bubbling oil where Churros are quickly fried, shaped into loops, and threaded into reeds that are then knotted for easy carrying.

They are meant to be purchased immediately after frying, usually by the dozens, and are munched on by visitors as they wander about taking tin the sights.

Churros are nothing more than fried batter of flour and water, but they are essential to a Spanish breakfast, dipped either in sugar or in a cup of coffee or thick hot chocolate...

If one is out on an all-night binge--a juerga, as it is called--it is the custom to end the evening by eating Churros and hot chocolate at the churreria, or churro store, which opens by dawn." ---The Foods and Wines of Spain, Penelope Casas [New York: Knopf] 1982 (p. Make a depression in the middle of each and fill with chichiarrones. ed.) iii.81 Burritos in the northern part of Mexico and in the southwestern part of the United States are quite different.

340-1) sum up the ingredients used and holiday connections. Our regional cookbooks confirm "burros" are indeed a larger version of "burritos" in Arizona and surrounding areas.Texas-Mexican restaurant owners considered it an insult.By a strange twist of fate, the insult launched a success.No one knows when or where it acquired the name fajita, which means girdle' or'strip' in Spanish and refers to the skirt steak originally used in the preparation...

Only in the last decade has refined, regional Mexican food taken a foot-hold in American cities, reflecting not only the tenets of Tex-Mex cookery by the cuisines of Mexico City, the Yucatan, and other regions with long-standing culinary traditions." ---America Eats Out, John Mariani [William Morrow: New York] 1991 (p.80-1) [1970s] "In the good old days, Texans went to "Mexican restaurants" and ate "Mexican food." Then in 1972, The Cuisines of Mexico, an influential cookbook by food authority Diana Kennedy, drew the line between authentic interior Mexican food and the "mixed plates" we ate at "so-called Mexican restaurants" in the United States.