Inmate internet dating tennessee


28-Aug-2017 15:04

And, each new hire costs more than

And, each new hire costs more than $1,000 to train.The program’s rising national profile resulted in Hopkins, some staffers, Crago, and mold technician Haley George, 28, traveling to New York late last month to speak at the Training Summit for Second Chance Act grantees.In 2011, she was arrested for theft and later flunked probation when a drug test came back hot.“I couldn’t get out of bed without a pill,” she said. “Jail was my help.” In 2015, drug charges sent her to prison.The number is even lower for successful graduates: less than 10 percent.Christine Hopkins is a relentless 82-year-old grandmother who makes a mean banana pudding and never takes no for an answer.

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And, each new hire costs more than $1,000 to train.

The program’s rising national profile resulted in Hopkins, some staffers, Crago, and mold technician Haley George, 28, traveling to New York late last month to speak at the Training Summit for Second Chance Act grantees.

In 2011, she was arrested for theft and later flunked probation when a drug test came back hot.

“I couldn’t get out of bed without a pill,” she said. “Jail was my help.” In 2015, drug charges sent her to prison.

,000 to train.The program’s rising national profile resulted in Hopkins, some staffers, Crago, and mold technician Haley George, 28, traveling to New York late last month to speak at the Training Summit for Second Chance Act grantees.In 2011, she was arrested for theft and later flunked probation when a drug test came back hot.“I couldn’t get out of bed without a pill,” she said. “Jail was my help.” In 2015, drug charges sent her to prison.The number is even lower for successful graduates: less than 10 percent.Christine Hopkins is a relentless 82-year-old grandmother who makes a mean banana pudding and never takes no for an answer.

And of those, 16 have returned to jail — that’s 26 percent, compared with 80 percent, the county’s usual recidivism rate.

And they’d still have to agree to enroll and hire people released from prison.

In Franklin County, when reentry program graduates get out of jail, they head to the factory — neatly dressed, screened for drugs, resume in hand, ready to interview and begin working.

Just over a year ago, George was in jail, recovering from a drug addiction.

Franklin County’s unemployment rate is 2.9 percent, making it hard to find help. So a coalition of folks came up with a simple plan to keep people from returning to jail.

While there, she lost custody of her children, now 4 and 9, who were living with a relative.